Living With a Recovering Addict

Shaniqua Juliano

Recovery is an ongoing process for the addict and their loved ones. Addiction strains the addict or alcoholic’s interpersonal relationships, with closer relationships facing more significant strain. Addiction strengthens over time and eventually dominates the addict’s life, particularly their relationships. So how do you live with an addict? Table of […]

Living With a Recovering Addict

Recovery is an ongoing process for the addict and their loved ones. Addiction strains the addict or alcoholic’s interpersonal relationships, with closer relationships facing more significant strain. Addiction strengthens over time and eventually dominates the addict’s life, particularly their relationships. So how do you live with an addict?

Living With An Addict

All relationships are affected in some way by addiction. Recovery is a lifelong process that changes things for someone in recovery daily. Often, recovery shifts goals, expectations, behavior, and even personality.

This, in turn, Delphi Health Group can change relatives and relationships as they will be forced to confront issues that were previously masked by addiction. The recovery process is one of the most significant challenges for the majority of people.

Loved ones can best help addicts by learning about addiction’s many facets, including possible spurs, health problems, being enabled, the recovery process, and the psychological changes that addiction causes.

If loved ones have a better understanding of addiction, they will be better equipped to help an addict stay clean.

Have Long-term Problems Under Control

Addiction creates many difficulties for addicts and their loved ones. Despite sobriety, a variety of symptoms will be present during recovery. While trying to rebuild their career and pay off addiction-related debts, recovering addicts are often faced with financial problems. Many serious illnesses, such as HIV, can be caused by drug use. Relationship problems can be extremely painful; rebuilding trust can take years, and it’s not always possible. Also, relapse is a certainty, even after many years. Knowing and preparing for these problems beforehand will reduce their severity and impact.

Keep Realistic Expectations

While recovering addicts have made progress, many of their loved ones are disappointed. Relapse is common when this occurs. It would help if you avoided disappointment because it will make recovering addicts more likely to relapse.

Promote Sobriety

Loved ones often play a critical role in maintaining sobriety after rehab, especially in the first few months. Changes that support sobriety include:

  • Preventing all substance abuse by keeping harmful substances out of the home
  • Enjoying activities together
  • Emphasizing new aspects of life
  • Associating with sober friends

Be Fair To Yourself

Addiction can cause loved ones to devote more of themselves than is fair. This is futile. This is incredibly unfair, and it causes resentment and bitterness, which helps fuel addiction relapse.

Yoga, therapy, and counseling are very effective. A support group can provide significant emotional support. These various groups work together to provide numerous benefits, including friendship, belonging, greater knowledge, and guidance.

Curb Stress

A primary cause of relapse is stress. Recovering addicts have a risk of relapse as they re-adjust to life without substances as an escape. While life on the outside is inherently stressful, it cannot be eliminated. It is, however, manageable. Where stress is naturally existent, relaxation techniques may be used. Some strategies include:

  • Journaling\Meditation\Exercise
  • Breathing techniques
  • Yoga-artistic expression
  • Enforce boundaries

Addiction enablers fail by providing limits and then ignoring their users’ repeated transgressions. That keeps the addict from taking them seriously and someone to be respected. They will ignore all boundaries, and that person will be gone.

How to Detect a Relapse

Unfortunately, relapses happen frequently. A majority of recovering addicts will relapse at some point in their lives. Recurrence does not mean long-term sobriety is in jeopardy. With attention and speed, relapse can be contained. If you suspect an opioid addict has relapsed, take the following steps:

  • Ask friends and family if they share your worries.
  • Use a caring, non-judgmental manner to state your concerns.
  • Have them contact their sponsor if they have questions.
  • Please encourage them to attend a support group meeting.
  • Asking them to contact their therapist might be useful.

Helpful Resources

Alina Lodge

Drug Abuse

Delphi Health Group

Meta Drug Rehab

US News

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