Dentist who extracted a patient’s tooth while riding a hoverboard sentenced to 12 years

An Alaska dentist was also filmed riding a hoverboard during a procedure on a patient who was under anesthesia was convicted on 46 counts of defrauding the federal Medicaid program has been sentenced to 12 years in prison.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Wolverton found Seth Lookhart, 35, guilty Jan. 17 of pressuring patients to needlessly undergo intravenous sedation to bill Medicaid for the service.

Wolverton on Monday suspended eight years of the sentence, leaving Lookhart 12 years of prison time to serve.

The state requested that the court order Lookhart to pay more than $2 million in restitution for the Medicaid fraud.

A 25-second video that appeared to have been filmed using a phone showed Lookhart riding a hoverboard into an exam room before removing a tooth from a sedated patient and then pivoting and riding away.

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A video showed Seth Lookhart riding a hoverboard while removing a tooth
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Alaska dentist, Seth Lookhart, who extracted a patient’s tooth on a hoverboard sentenced to 12 years in jail

Seth Lookhart, 35, was convicted on 46 felony and misdemeanor counts in January, including medical assistance fraud, scheme to defraud, illegal practice of dentistry and reckless endangerment.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Wolverton sentenced Lookhart on Monday to serve 20 years in jail with eight years suspended, the statement said. That means Lookhart will serve 12 years behind bars. He also cannot practice dentistry during his 10 years of probation.

Lookhart apologized for his actions while reading from a prepared statement.

“Looking back, I can’t say exactly when I began to go off course,” he said, CNN affiliate KTUU reported. “While I do not doubt that I was able to render care and alleviate the pain to many people who were in dire need, I also know that I could have and should have maintained better discipline and focus while serving a patient base I came to love.”

He also

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Dentist: Closure of practices impacts patients’ oral health

Shaniqua Juliano

JOHNSTON, R.I. (WPRI) ─ A Johnston dentist believes dentistry is an essential business, but argues that it hasn’t been treated as such throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

Rupesh Udeshi, dentist and co-owner of Dental Associates of Rhode Island, said the months his practice was closed had a big impact on the health of many of his patients.

“We’ve had a great backlog and problems that were minor, that have become major. The patient may have just had a cavity or needed a filling, but we haven’t seen them and it’s now more severe and it’s a root canal, and some people who maybe needed a root canal ─ now they need to have the tooth out,” he said.

The World Health Organization recently recommended delaying routine dental care because of the pandemic. But the American Dental Association says they “respectfully yet strongly disagrees.”

“Oral health is integral to overall health. Dentistry

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Miami hospital flooded with critical patients as coronavirus cases rise

Shaniqua Juliano

Krystal Spaulding is almost out of breath as she sprints from one critically ill patient to another at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Coronavirus cases are increasing at an alarming rate and the hospital is seeing more and more patients every day, the nurse said.

“There’s just a lot of running around with this current wave of [COVID-19] that we’re experiencing here in Miami,” Spaulding told ABC News. “The patients seem to be way more critical than the first wave.”

Florida reported over 10,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, the biggest one-day increase in the state since the pandemic started.

As the state continues to shatter records for coronavirus cases amid the reopening of the economy, hospitals in Florida — like Jackson Memorial — are seeing a rise in hospitalizations. And as a safety net hospital, it is seeing more minority populations being infected with COVID.

The state has seen

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L.A. Surge Hospital for coronavirus patients to close in June

Shaniqua Juliano

The state-funded Los Angeles Surge Hospital, which has seen relatively few patients since it opened five weeks ago to treat an anticipated overflow of COVID-19 cases, will close by June 30, officials said Wednesday.

In addition, emergency medical facilities that had been set up throughout the state will begin reducing operations, according to the California Health and Human Services Agency and Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

The Los Angeles Surge Hospital, located on the grounds of the shuttered St. Vincent Medical Center near downtown Los Angeles, was set up to handle as many as 270 patients a day. But the hospital has never had more than 25 patients at a time, officials said.

When the coronavirus crisis began and officials feared hospitals would be overrun, the state signed a six-month, $16-million lease with Verity Health System, which owned St. Vincent and had declared bankruptcy.

The state also paid healthcare companies

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